The Society convenes every 2nd Thursday of the month at 5:30pm.

Meeting Agenda: 

5:30pm    Review of current business

6:00pm    Potluck dinner

7:00pm    Featured presentation begins

Wessaweskeag Historical Society

The Wessaweskeag Historical Society was founded three decades ago and is a nonprofit, charitable organization anchored in South Thomaston. It maintains an archives and museum contiguous to the town’s public library, hosts monthly potluck suppers and heritage programming available to the public. The Society also hosts the annual Heritage Day, sponsors local historic preservation and cooperates with kindred community organizations. Higher education for local youth is supported through the Society’s scholarship program

Thursday April 11: “No Bridges, No Problem: Steamboat Travel in Maine” by Cipperly Good, Curator of the Penobscot Maine Museum in Seasport, Maine

Opening day of the Waldo-Hancock Bridge and a parade is crossing the bridge as the Steamer BELFAST passes underneath, marking the transition from steamboat to automobile travel in Maine.  Eastern Collection, LB2007.1.104664.

Opening day of the Waldo-Hancock Bridge and a parade is crossing the bridge as the Steamer BELFAST passes underneath, marking the transition from steamboat to automobile travel in Maine.  Eastern Collection, LB2007.1.104664.

Until the 1930s, traveling by automobile up the coast of Maine required circumnavigating upstream on the Kennebec and Penobscot Rivers or waiting for a small ferry to cross at the river mouths.  Travelers from Boston to Eastport instead booked passage aboard steamships which calle ports along the Kennebec River, Penobscot Bay and River, Blue Hill and Frenchman's Bay, and other stops further Downeast.  Learn more about the steamboats that plied the coastal waters of Maine and the companies that kept them in business.

Cipperly Good oversees the object, archive, and library collections and designs exhibits, such as the Summer Folk exhibit from which this talk originates.  Ms. Good holds a Bachelor’s degree from Colby College in Waterville, Maine, where she double majored in History and American Studies.  She spent her junior year “abroad” at the Williams College-Mystic Seaport Maritime Studies Program, which sparked her career in maritime history and maritime museums.  She holds a Masters of Arts in Museum Studies, with a concentration in American History, from The George Washington University in Washington, D.C. Previous to working at Penobscot Marine Museum, Ms. Good taught maritime history for the Ocean Classroom-Proctor Academy semester, and worked as a curator at the Los Angeles Maritime Museum and Falmouth (Massachusetts) Historical Society.